I would like to  dedicate this post to all those ladies of the frontier, those who needed to learn how to shoot and face every danger that men did, in addition to providing every aspect of everyday needs for their families. Also, to those women who dropped everything to follow after their soldier husbands, trudging over all manner of country, facing all manner of hardships, only to have people try to deny their very presence 200 years later.

Top picture (I didn’t take it, but I wish I had; just look at it!):

Kristi Heasley is passionate about frontier history and participates in re-enactments and educational events in her spare time. 

(Source)

The bottom images are mine and they are from one of my favorite monuments I’ve ever encountered. It stands at Fort Ontario in Oswego, N.Y.

"From the hearth of America comes the heart of America."

(Inset at base) “This hearth is dedicated to the women and children of all races who lived and died on the colonial frontier. It was built by their grateful descendants in the bicentennial year of our Lord, one thousand, nine hundred and seventy six. Where they walked, the United States of America began.”



War of 1812 Grand Tactical (2014), Sackets Harbor, N.Y.



Mystic Seaport is a beautiful open-air museum in southeastern Connecticut. It is one of the oldest such attractions in the United States. It offers a look at how a seacoast community would have looked, and what its livelihood would have been like, in the 19th century. There are several ships and dozens of historical structures. Entry is a little expensive, but there is so much to see and do inside, including crafts for the kids, sailing excursions, and living history demonstrations.



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I was so fortunate to meet this amazing woman when I went to the Ogdensburg French & Indian War reenactment two weeks ago. This is Linda Russell, a musical historian and costumed interpreter of many American eras. She is so skilled and so knowledgeable, it blew me away. Her works are some of the most authentic representations of colonial music that I’ve ever heard, and she’s just a beautiful, amazingly talented person. Below is a video I found on YouTube of an interview with her (Linda’s parts are amazing, so it’s definitely worth watching). and I also want to share her website: www.lindarussellmusic.com.

I totally bought a CD, “The Good Old Colony Days,” and just had a chance to listen to it for the first time last night. What a pleasure!

I was so fortunate to meet this amazing woman when I went to the Ogdensburg French & Indian War reenactment two weeks ago. This is Linda Russell, a musical historian and costumed interpreter of many American eras. She is so skilled and so knowledgeable, it blew me away. Her works are some of the most authentic representations of colonial music that I’ve ever heard, and she’s just a beautiful, amazingly talented person. Below is a video I found on YouTube of an interview with her (Linda’s parts are amazing, so it’s definitely worth watching). and I also want to share her website: www.lindarussellmusic.com.

I totally bought a CD, “The Good Old Colony Days,” and just had a chance to listen to it for the first time last night. What a pleasure!



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I’ve been a little neglectful on the illustrations here; sorry about that. Time’s been getting away from me, and we’ve been spending most of what we have outdoors, so I hope you, too, have been able to enjoy the beautiful weather!
I’ve taken to keeping a sketchbook again. I used to draw all the time in a sketchbook when I was younger, but had gotten away from that over the years. These days I often keep historical research notes and anything I find interesting in my sketchbook. The majority of these notes were conveyed to me orally by historians and living history folks at events, and often transcribed here from memory.
Anyway, for those of you who also draw, I really recommend keeping a sketchbook. It keeps you somewhat organized, in practice, and offers a place to develop ideas from the earliest stages of conception.

I’ve been a little neglectful on the illustrations here; sorry about that. Time’s been getting away from me, and we’ve been spending most of what we have outdoors, so I hope you, too, have been able to enjoy the beautiful weather!

I’ve taken to keeping a sketchbook again. I used to draw all the time in a sketchbook when I was younger, but had gotten away from that over the years. These days I often keep historical research notes and anything I find interesting in my sketchbook. The majority of these notes were conveyed to me orally by historians and living history folks at events, and often transcribed here from memory.

Anyway, for those of you who also draw, I really recommend keeping a sketchbook. It keeps you somewhat organized, in practice, and offers a place to develop ideas from the earliest stages of conception.



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One of my favorite things about the Ogdensburg Founders Day French & Indian War reenactment is the way Native Americans are represented. It’s probably the best I’ve ever seen. This year, they even had an Iroquois womens choir to sing traditional songs. Above, two reenactors maneuver around the battlefield. I won’t lie; when the man in the top picture turned and looked straight into my camera at the end of the battle, all the things I learned about the massacre in Deerfield came flashing before my eyes, and my heart stopped a little. We spoke a little later in the day, and he is one of the most amazing people I’ve ever met. If either of these gentlemen look familiar, you may have seen them in movies or documentaries within the last ten years.



Ogdensburg’s annual Founders Day French & Indian War reenactment, at the site of Fort la Presentation, was this weekend! This is one of my absolute favorite events of the year, and it never disappoints.



If ever I get myself to Europe, this is one of the places I’d really want to visit. This is Bourtange, Netherlands; it is a restored mid-18th-century star fort, probably the most magnificent in the world. The village within the fortifications is an open-air museum.

Photo sources: Top, bottom left, bottom right.

I was not permitted to take photographs inside the Silas Deane house when we visited; however, the organization that preserves the house and offers tours has a webpage that not only offers several beautiful pictures, but it tells more about the history of the structure here. (It is also listed as the source link on this post.)



Finally finished this bit of silliness for the art challenge on deviantArt! :)
Once again, the challenge was to redesign Sailor Moon’s outfit in honor of the new Sailor Moon Crystal series. It was fun and good practice.

Finally finished this bit of silliness for the art challenge on deviantArt! :)

Once again, the challenge was to redesign Sailor Moon’s outfit in honor of the new Sailor Moon Crystal series. It was fun and good practice.



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